Greatest Common Factor of 55 and 66 is 11

How to find the Greatest Common Factor of 55 and 66?

There are many methods we can apply to calculate the GCF of 55 and 66.


In our first method, we'll find out the prime factorisation of the 55 and 66 numbers.


In our second method, we'll create a list of all the factors of the 55 and 66 numbers.

These are the numbers that divide the 55 and 66 numbers without a remainder.

Once we have these, all we have to do is to find the one that is the biggest common number from the 2 lists.


Now let's look at each methods, and calculate the GCF of 55 and 66.

Methods of calculating the GCF of 55 and 66:

Method 1 - Prime Factorisation

With the prime factorisation method, all we have to do is to find the common prime factors of 55 and 66, and then multiply them. Really simple:

Step 1: Let's create a list of all the prime factors of 55 and 66:

Prime factors of 55:

As you can see below, the prime factors of 55 are 5 and 11.

Let's illustrate the prime factorization of 55 in exponential form:

55 = 51x111

Prime factors of 66:

As you can see below, the prime factors of 66 are 2, 3 and 11.

Let's illustrate the prime factorization of 66 in exponential form:

66 = 21x31x111


Step 2: Write down a list of all the common prime factors of 55 and 66:

As seen in the boxes above, the common prime factors of 55 and 66 are 11.


Step 3: All we have to do now is to multiply these common prime factors:

Find the product of all common prime factors by multiplying them:

111=11

Done!

According to our calculations above, the Greatest Common Factor of 55 and 66 is 11

Method 2 - List of Factors

With this simple method, we'll need to find all the factors of 55 and 66, factors are numbers that divide the another number without a remainder, and simply identify the common ones, then choose which is the largest one.


Step 1: Create a list of all the numbers that divide 55 and 66 without a remainder:

List of factors that divide 55 without a remainder are:

1, 5, 11 and 55.

List of factors that divide 66 without a remainder are:

1, 2, 3, 6, 11, 22, 33 and 66.


Step 2: Identify the largest common number from the 2 lists above:

As you can see in the lists of factors from above, for the numbers 55 and 66, we have highlighted the number 11, which means that we have found the Greatest Common Factor, or GCF.

According to our calculations above, the Greatest Common Factor of 55 and 66 is 11

Method 3 - Euclidean algorithm

The Euclidean algorithm says that if number k is the GCM of 55 and 66, then the number k is also the GCM of the division remainder of the numbers 55 and 66.

We follow this procedure until the reminder is 0.

The Greatest Common Divisor is the last nonzero number.


Step 1: Sort the numbers into ascending order:

55, 66

Step 2

Take out, from the set, the smallers number as you divisor: 55

The remaining set is: 66

Find the reminder of the division between the number and the divisor

66 mod 55 = 11


Gather the divisor and all of the remainders and sort them in ascending order. Remove any duplicates and 0. Our set is:

11, 55

Repeat the process until there is only one number in the set.

Take out, from the set, the smallers number as you divisor: 11

The remaining set is: 55

Find the reminder of the division between the number and the divisor

55 mod 11 = 0


Gather the divisor and all of the remainders and sort them in ascending order. Remove any duplicates and 0. Our set is:

11

Step 3: Take the remaining number from our set

The Greatest Common Factor of 55 and 66 is 11

Method 4 - Binary Greatest Common Divisor algorithm

The binary GCD algorithm, also known as Stein's algorithm or the binary Euclidean algorithm, is an algorithm that computes the greatest common divisor of two nonnegative integers. Stein's algorithm uses simpler arithmetic operations than the conventional Euclidean algorithm; it replaces division with arithmetic shifts, comparisons, and subtraction.

Although the algorithm in its contemporary form was first published by the Israeli physicist and programmer Josef Stein in 1967, it may have been known by the 2nd century BCE, in ancient China.

Step 1: Sort the numbers, and set initial GCF equal to 1

The list: 55, 66

Step 2: Divide all of the remaining even values by 2, remove the duplicates and sort.
Repeat the process if there are even numbers in the list:

66/2 = 33

The resulting list: 33, 55

Step 3: Pick the first number, 33.
Subtract 33 from the remaining value(s) and divide the outcome by 2.
Remove the duplicates and sort:

(55-33)/2 = 11

The resulting list: 11, 33

Step 4: Pick the first number, 11.
Subtract 11 from the remaining value(s) and divide the outcome by 2.
Remove the duplicates and sort:

(33-11)/2 = 11

The resulting list: 11

Step 5: Only one number remains, 11.
Multiply it by your current GCF:

GCF = 1*11 = 11

The Greatest Common Factor of 55 and 66 is 11